Adrenochrome: Know The Facts

Adrenochrome

There is a lot of buzz about Adrenochrome. However, most of the information people are reading about it is not based on facts. Some people believe it can help them avoid depression by improving their mood. 

There are several myths and misconceptions related to it. Let’s get a clear idea of what it actually is, how it works, and the benefits of using it. What is Adrenochrome?

Adrenochrome is a product released during the oxidation of adrenaline (epinephrine). It is an unstable compound. However, when it combines with monosemicarbazone, it forms another compound called adrenochrome monosemicarbazone or carbazochrome that is stable. [1]

This form of adrenochrome is not very soluble. However, its solubility increases when it is converted to a sodium salicylate complex. 

The soluble form of adrenochrome can be used as an injection that can be administered intramuscularly or consumed orally. The medical term used to refer to this compound is carbazochrome salicylate. [2]

What led to the possible spread of misinformation about Adrenochrome?

In the last few months, most countries in the world are facing lockdowns to limit the spread of COVID-19. As a result, the average time spent by people on social media and web browsing has increased drastically. 

This has led to several topics spreading more rapidly than ever and one of which is “adrenochrome”. Social media is buzzing with how this can help you feel younger and happier by providing a sense of ‘high’. 

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The promising discussions have lured people into believing that is a wonder drug.

Almost 70 years ago, Aldous Huxley, in his essay “The Doors of Perception”  wrote about the possibility of it producing effects similar to that of psychedelic cactus. He described it as a compound naturally produced in the body during the decomposition of adrenaline.

Later, a few novels also mentioned these effects of adrenochrome giving it a mystical status.

Beware, before you get hypnotized by this information, let’s learn what the actual effects and benefits of Adrenochrome are. 

What are the uses of adrenochrome?

While it is primarily known for its ability to create a feeling of ‘high’ or youthfulness, it also offers other benefits. 

The chemical structure of Adrenochrome is comparable to its parent molecule, adrenaline. Hence, it may produce an action similar to that of adrenalin. It would help a person feel ‘high’ just the way its precursor adrenaline does, in some aspects. 

Adrenalin is distributed throughout the body in different tissues and cells. It is secreted in the nervous system and then, carried to all parts of the body where it performs different functions. Therefore, Adrenochrome, which is formed due to the oxidation of adrenaline, is also found in all organs and cells. [3]

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However, in spite of the adrenaline-like action of Adrenochrome on the blood vessels, it does not produce the systemic effects of sympathomimetic drugs. 

This can be used for the treatment of bleeding. Adrenochrome Monosemicarbazone formed during the oxidation of the chemical messenger, adrenaline, has the ability to constrict the blood vessels.

It creates a vasoconstriction effect at the site of injury or wound and arrests bleeding. [4]

It also prevents the excessive loss of blood by promoting clot formation. Research studies have suggested that has the ability to improve capillary resistance and promote the retraction of severed capillaries.

This means the use of Adrenochrome in the form of injections could be beneficial for patients who suffer from bleeding or bruising due to fragile capillaries.

It would also help the severed or broken capillaries to retract faster and more efficiently in the event of cuts or injuries. This would help to reduce the loss of blood. [5]

It may help to reduce capillary permeability and thus, control the flow of substances in and out of the cells and tissues. It may also ensure the vitamins, minerals, healing nutrients, antioxidants, and other compounds needed for cellular functions do not leave the cell in large amounts. This would support healthy cellular functions. [6]

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It can be used to shorten the bleeding time in patients who suffer from bleeding tendencies. The risk of anemia is higher in patients who suffer from bleeding disorders.

The dysfunctions related to the clotting factors, platelets, and the deficiency of vitamin K may prevent the faster clotting of blood after injuries.

As a result, the blood loss may continue for a longer duration leading to life-threatening consequences. The use of Adrenochrome could be beneficial in such cases as it would speed up the clotting and shorten the bleeding time. [7]

There is evidence that suggests it can produce a Vitamin P-like action. Vitamin P refers to the group of plant-based compounds that possess natural medicinal properties. These include flavonoids and bioflavonoids found in rich amounts in plant-based sources.

Flavonoids and bioflavonoids improve health by acting as antioxidants and reducing free radical damage in normal tissues. It may produce an action similar to that of vitamin P, thanks to its natural antioxidant properties.

This would help to inhibit the development of diseases linked to oxidative damage by free radicals. [8]

Conclusion

It is a beneficial compound that can be used in the treatment and prevention of several diseases. The judicious use of Adrenochrome could be beneficial for patients with bleeding disorders and even mental health issues.

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However, it is important to know the mode of action of Adrenochrome and the best ways to use it to prevent abuse. Further research is required to confirm the benefits of Adrenochrome. 

It is advisable to consult a physician before you start using Adrenochrome to prevent any adverse effects. 

References:

  1. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0074774208600252 
  2. https://drugs.ncats.io/drug/70G54NQL71 
  3. http://orthomolecular.org/library/jom/1990/pdf/1990-v05n01-p032.pdf 
  4. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/4157544/
  5. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14975514/
  6. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/cr50026a001
  7. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/pharmacology-toxicology-and-pharmaceutical-science/adrenochrome
  8. https://www.scbt.com/p/adrenochrome-semicarbazone-69-81-8

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